Are you the publisher? Claim or contact us about this channel


Embed this content in your HTML

Search

Report adult content:

click to rate:

Account: (login)

More Channels


Channel Catalog


    0 0

    PMID:  Phytother Res. 2002 Dec;16(8):754-7. PMID: 12458481 Abstract Title:  Inhibitory effect of chlorophyllin on the frequency of micronuclei induced by sodium nitrite in mice. Abstract:  In this report the potency of chlorophyllin (CHL) was evaluated to prevent two types of damage produced by nitrite in mice: the increase of micronucleated polychromatic erythrocytes (MNPE) and the bone marrow toxicity, measured as the index of polychromatic erythrocytes/normochromatic erythrocytes (PE/NE). The study was done in eight groups of male mice. The first three groups were administered orally for 4 days with sodium nitrite (10, 15 and 20 mg/kg), the daily administration with nitrite was followed by an intraperitoneal administration of CHL (4 mg/kg), three more groups were administered with the same amounts of nitrite, a seventh group of mice was treated with distilled water while another was treated with CHL (4 mg/kg). Our study produced two main results: (a) no bone marrow injury was induced by any of the tested chemicals, as indicated with the PE/NE index, and (b) CHL protected (as high as 44%) the MNPE produced in nitrite treated mice.

    0 0

    PMID:  Food Chem Toxicol. 2012 Jul ;50(7):2275-81. Epub 2012 Apr 21. PMID: 22542553 Abstract Title:  Antigenotoxic effect of acute, subacute and chronic treatments with Amazonian camu-camu (Myrciaria dubia) juice on mice blood cells. Abstract:  Myrciaria dubia, a plant native to the Amazon region, stands out as a fruit rich in vitamin C and other metabolites with nutritional potential. We evaluated the antioxidant, genotoxic and antigenotoxic potential of M. dubia juice on blood cells of mice after acute, subacute and chronic treatments. Flavonoids and vitamin C present in the fruit of M. dubia were quantified. In vitro antioxidant activity was evaluated by DPPH assay. Blood samples were collected for analysis after treatment, and the alkaline comet assay was used to analyze the genotoxic and antigenotoxic activity (ex vivo analysis using H(2)O(2)). The amount of vitamin C per 100mL of M. dubia was 52.5mg. DPPH assay showed an antioxidant potential of the fruit. No M. dubia concentration tested exerted any genotoxic effect on mice blood cells. In the ex vivo test, the juice demonstrated antigenotoxic effect, and acute treatment produced the most significant results. After the treatments, there was no evidence of toxicity or death. In conclusion, our data show that M. dubia juice has antigenotoxic and antioxidant activities, though with no genotoxicity for blood cells. Nevertheless, more in-depth studies should be conducted to assess the safety of this fruit for human consumption.

    0 0

    n/a PMID:  J Toxicol Environ Health A. 2017 May 19:1-9. Epub 2017 May 19. PMID: 28524728 Abstract Title:  A reduction in DNA damage in neural tissue and peripheral blood of old mice treated with caffeine. Abstract:  Studies on caffeine consumption have shown a negative correlation with development of some diseases with subsequent beneficial manifestations. Our aim was to assess the effects of caffeine on peripheral blood and neural tissue DNA in young adult and aged mice. Male Swiss mice (age 2-3 or 16-18 months, respectively) were treated with a caffeine solution (0.3 g/l) for 4 weeks, while controls received water. After the treatments, blood and hippocampal cells (for a comet assay) and femurs (for a micronucleus [MN] test) were collected. The comet assay of peripheral blood and hippocampal cells demonstrated no significant differences between caffeine-treated and control young adult mice in terms of DNA damage index (DI) and frequency. In contrast, when comparing young adult with aged animals, significant differences were observed in DNA damage in blood and hippocampal cells. The differences between aged animals (with or without caffeine) consisted of a significant decrease in DNA DI in the group that received caffeine. In the MN test, an increase in frequency of micronucleated polychromatic (PCE) erythrocytes was noted in aged animals that received water compared to young adult mice. In addition, comparing treated with control aged murine groups, a decrease in frequency of MN was found in PCE erythrocytes of caffeine-treated mice. Chronic caffeine consumption was neither genotoxic nor mutagenic at the dose tested; however, it appears that caffeine actually protected mice from genotoxicity and mutagenicity, consequences attributed to aging.

    0 0

    PMID:  J Cancer Prev. 2017 Sep ;22(3):174-181. Epub 2017 Sep 30. PMID: 29018782 Abstract Title:  Comparison of Blueberry (Vaccinium spp.) and Vitamin C via Antioxidative and Epigenetic Effects in Human. Abstract:  BACKGROUND: Chemopreventive effects and the underlying mechanisms of blueberry (Vaccinium spp.) are not clearly understood in human. We hypothesized blueberry would work via antioxidative and epigenetic modulation, which is similar to vitamin C.METHODS: We performed a pilot and non-inferiority study in healthy young women (n = 12), who consumed vitamin C (1 g/d) or 240 mL of blueberry juice (total polyphenols 300 mg and proanthocyanidin 76 mg/d) for 2 weeks. We analyzed 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) and malondialdehyde (MDA) levels in their urine, and global and specific DNA methylation at the NAD(P)H quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1), methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR), or DNA methyltransferase 1 (DNMT1) genes in their blood.RESULTS: Urinary 8-OHdG levels were reduced by blueberry consumption rather than by vitamin C. The methylation (%) of the MTHFR was significantly decreased in blueberry-consumers and the antioxidant-susceptible subgroup, whose urinary MDA levels were decreased by the intervention. We also found a positive correlation between changes of urinary 8-OHdG and of DNA methylation at the MTHFR or the DNMT1 (P

    read more


    0 0

    PMID:  Crit Rev Food Sci Nutr. 2007;47(8):735-48. PMID: 17987447 Abstract Title:  Black pepper and its pungent principle-piperine: a review of diverse physiological effects. Abstract:  Black pepper (Piper nigrum) is one of the most widely used among spices. It is valued for its distinct biting quality attributed to the alkaloid, piperine. Black pepper is used not only in human dietaries but also for a variety of other purposes such as medicinal, as a preservative, and in perfumery. Many physiological effects of black pepper, its extracts, or its major active principle, piperine, have been reported in recent decades. Dietary piperine, by favorably stimulating the digestive enzymes of pancreas, enhances the digestive capacity and significantly reduces the gastrointestinal food transit time. Piperine has been demonstrated in in vitro studies to protect against oxidative damage by inhibiting or quenching free radicals and reactive oxygen species. Black pepper or piperine treatment has also been evidenced to lower lipid peroxidation in vivo and beneficially influence cellular thiol status, antioxidant molecules and antioxidant enzymes in a number of experimental situations of oxidative stress. The most far-reaching attribute of piperine has been its inhibitory influence on enzymatic drug biotransforming reactions in the liver. It strongly inhibits hepatic and intestinal aryl hydrocarbon hydroxylase and UDP-glucuronyl transferase. Piperine has been documented to enhance the bioavailability of a number of therapeutic drugs as well as phytochemicals by this very property. Piperine's bioavailability enhancing property is also partly attributed to increased absorption as a result of its effect on the ultrastructure of intestinal brush border. Although initially there were a few controversial reports regarding its safety as a food additive, such evidence has been questionable, and later studies have established the safety of black pepper or its active principle, piperine, in several animal studies. Piperine, while it is non-genotoxic, has in fact been found to possess anti-mutagenic and anti-tumor influences.

    0 0

    PMID:  Genet Mol Res. 2015 ;14(3):9745-52. Epub 2015 Aug 19. PMID: 26345907 Abstract Title:  Antimutagenic action of the triterpene betulinic acid isolated from Scoparia dulcis (Scrophulariaceae). Abstract:  The mutagenic and antimutagenic activities of triterpene betulinic acid {3b-3-hydroxy-lup-20(29)-en-28-oic} isolated from the roots of Scoparia dulcis (Scrophulariaceae) were analyzed using the somatic mutation and recombination test (SMART) in the wings of Drosophila melanogaster. The mutagenic potential of betulinic acid was evaluated at 3 different concentrations (1.64, 3.28, and 6.57 mM). Antimutagenic activity evaluation was performed by co-treatment trials in which the flies received betulinic acid at 3 different concentrations in addition to 10 mM pro-mutagenic urethane. The results demonstrated that betulinic acid was not capable of causing DNA damage. However, the frequency of small single spots, large spots, and twin spots was significantly reduced. In the high bioactivation cross, betulinic acid was significantly active and exerted enhanced antimutagenic activity, possibly as a desmutagen.

    0 0

    PMID:  Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys. 2002 Jan 1;52(1):212-23. PMID: 15586444 Abstract Title:  Amelioration of genotoxic damage by certain phytoproducts in human lymphocyte cultures. Abstract:  The antigenotoxic effect of some phytoproducts like carotenoid (beta-carotene), curcumin, ascorbic acid and flavonoid (genistein)was demonstrated on the genotoxicity induced by hydrocortisone. Human lymphocyte cultures were studied for the induction of chromosomal aberrations, sister chromatid exchanges and effect on cell cycle kinetics with or without the presence of metabolic activation (S9 mix). The phytoproducts were studied in two most effective doses viz. carotenoid (0.5 and 0.7 microM), curcumin (15 and 25 microM), ascorbic acid (60 and 80 microM) and flavonoid (25 and 40 microM) in 24, 48 and 72 h cultures, and they were found to reduce chromosomal aberrations, sister chromatid exchange and increase replication index. The present study showed that the ascorbic acid and curcumin were more effective than carotenoid and flavonoid, though all provide protection against the genotoxicity of hydrocortisone.

    0 0

    PMID:  Zhong Yao Cai. 2000 Dec;23(12):759-61. PMID: 12575269 Abstract Title:  [Studies on the antimutagenic effect of asparagus juice]. Abstract:  Micronucleus (MN) test, sister chromatid exchanges (SCE) and sperm malformation test were used to study the effects of asparagus juice on the mutagenic activity of cyclophosphamide (CP). It was found that, asparagus juice itself showed no effcet on the incidence of MN, SCE and sperm malformation, but asparagus juice reduced the incidence of MN (from 60.0@1000 to 50.3@1000-26.6@1000), SCE (from 29.22 times/cell to 26.40-13.37 times/cell) and sperm malformation (from 61.0@1000 to 51.2@1000-28.6@1000) induced by CP respectively. The inhibitory effects showed a dose dependent relation, which was statistically significant.

    0 0

    PMID:  J Agric Food Chem. 2002 Jan 30 ;50(3):610-7. PMID: 11804538 Abstract Title:  Antioxidant and antimutagenic properties of aqueous extract of date fruit (Phoenix dactylifera L. Arecaceae). Abstract:  Fruits of the date palm (Phoenix dactylifera L. Arecaceae) are very commonly consumed in many parts of the world and are a vital component of the diet in most of the Arabian countries. This preliminary study documents for the first time its antioxidant and antimutagenic properties in vitro. There was a dose-dependent inhibition of superoxide and hydroxyl radicals by an aqueous extract of date fruit. The amount of fresh extract required to scavenge 50% of superoxide radicals was equivalent to 0.8 mg/mL of date fruit in the riboflavin photoreduction method. An extract of 2.2 mg/mL of date fruit was needed for 50% hydroxyl-radical-scavenging activity in the deoxyribose degradation method. Concentrations of 1.5 and 4.0 mg/mL completely inhibited superoxide and hydroxyl radicals, respectively. Aqueous date extract was also found to inhibit significantly the lipid peroxidation and protein oxidation in a dose-dependent manner. In an Fe(2+)/ascorbate system, an extract of 1.9 mg/mL of date fruit was needed for 50% inhibition of lipid peroxides. In a time course inhibition study of lipid peroxide, at a 2.0 mg/mL concentration of date extract, there was a complete inhibition of TBARS formation in the early stages of the incubation period that increased during later stages of the incubation. Similarly, in the high Fe(2+)/ascorbate induction system a concentration of 2.3 mg/mL inhibited carbonyl formation measured by DNPH reaction by 50%. Moreover, a concentration of 4.0 mg/mL completely inhibited lipid peroxide and protein carbonyl formation. Date fruit extract also produced a dose-dependent inhibition of benzo(a)pyrene-induced mutagenecity on Salmonella tester strains TA-98 and TA-100 with metabolic activation. Extract from 3.6 mg/plate and 4.3 mg/plate was found required for 50% inhibition of His+ revertant formation in TA-98 and TA-100, respectively. These results indicate that antioxidant and antimutagenic activity in date fruit is quite potent and implicates the presence of compounds with potent free-radical-scavenging activity.

    0 0

    PMID:  Cytotechnology. 2015 Feb 15. Epub 2015 Feb 15. PMID: 25682053 Abstract Title:  Lasallia pustulata lichen as possible natural antigenotoxic, antioxidant, antimicrobial and anticancer agent. Abstract:  The methanol extract of the lichen Lasallia pustulata was tested for genotoxic, antioxidant, antimicrobial and anticancer activities. We did this using a cytokinesis block micronucleus (MN) assay on peripheral blood lymphocytes, by measuring free radical and superoxide anion scavenging activity, reducing power, determining of total phenolic compounds and determining the total flavonoid content, measuring the minimal inhibitory concentration by the broth microdilution method against five species of bacteria and five species of fungi and by using the microculture tetrazolium test on FemX (human melanoma) and LS174 (human colon carcinoma) cell lines. As a result of this study, we found that the methanol extract of L. pustulata did not modify the frequency of the MN and nuclear division index in comparison to untreated cells (p > 0.05). These results revealed that the methanol extract had moderate free radical scavenging activity with IC50 values of 395.56 μg/mL. Moreover, the extract tested had effective reducing power and superoxide anion radical scavenging. The values of the minimum inhibitory concentration against the tested microorganisms ranged from 0.625 to 20 mg/mL. In addition, the extract tested had strong anticancer activity against both cell lines with IC50 values of 46.67 and 71.71 μg/mL.

    0 0

    PMID:  Molecules. 2014 ;19(3):3160-72. Epub 2014 Mar 14. PMID: 24637991 Abstract Title:  Extract from Armoracia rusticana and its flavonoid components protect human lymphocytes against oxidative damage induced by hydrogen peroxide. Abstract:  DNA damage prevention is an important mechanism involved in cancer prevention by dietary compounds. Armoracia rusticana is cultivated mainly for its roots that are used in the human diet as a pungent spice. The roots represent rich sources of biologically active phytocompounds, which are beneficial for humans. In this study we investigated the modulation of H₂O₂ genotoxicity using the A. rusticana root aqueous extract (AE) and two flavonoids (kaempferol or quercetin). Human lymphocytes pre-treated with AE, kaempferol and quercetin were challenged with H₂O₂ and the DNA damage was assessed by the comet assay. At first we assessed a non-genotoxic concentration of AE and flavonoids, respectively. In lymphocytes challenged with H₂O₂ we proved that the 0.0025 mg·mL⁻¹ concentration of AE protected human DNA. It significantly reduced H₂O₂-induced oxidative damage (from 78% to 35.75%). Similarly, a non-genotoxic concentration of kaempferol (5 μg·mL⁻¹) significantly diminished oxidative DNA damage (from 83.3% to 19.4%), and the same concentration of quercetin also reduced the genotoxic effect of H₂O₂ (from 83.3% to 16.2%). We conclude that AE, kaempferol and quercetin probably act as antimutagens. The molecular mechanismsunderlying their antimutagenic activity might be explained by their antioxidant properties.

    0 0

    PMID:  Exp Ther Med. 2015 Nov ;10(5):1615-1623. Epub 2015 Sep 17. PMID: 26640527 Abstract Title:  Biological and therapeutic activities, and anticancer properties of curcumin. Abstract:  Curcumin (diferuloylmethane) is a polyphenol derived from the Curcuma longa plant. Curcumin has been used extensively in Ayurvedic medicine, as it is nontoxic and exhibits a variety of therapeutic properties, including antioxidant, analgesic, anti-inflammatory and antiseptic activities. Recently, certain studies have indicated that curcumin may exert anticancer effects in a variety of biological pathways involved in mutagenesis, apoptosis, tumorigenesis, cell cycle regulation and metastasis. The present study reviewed previous studies in the literature, which support the therapeutic activity of curcumin in cancer. In addition, the present study elucidated a number of the challenges concerning the use of curcumin as an adjuvant chemotherapeutic agent. All the studies reviewed herein suggest that curcumin is able to exert anti-inflammatory, antiplatelet, antioxidative, hepatoprotective and antitumor activities, particularly against cancers of the liver, skin, pancreas, prostate, ovary, lung and head neck, as well as having a positive effect in the treatment of arthritis.

    0 0

    PMID:  Mutat Res. 2012 Oct-Dec;751(2):287-303. Epub 2012 Jun 7. PMID: 22683846 Abstract Title:  MicroRNAs as targets for dietary and pharmacological inhibitors of mutagenesis and carcinogenesis. Abstract:  MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have been implicated in many biological processes, cancer, and other diseases. In addition, miRNAs are dysregulated following exposure to toxic and genotoxic agents. Here we review studies evaluating modulation of miRNAs by dietary and pharmacological agents, which could potentially be exploited for inhibition of mutagenesis and carcinogenesis. This review covers natural agents, including vitamins, oligoelements, polyphenols, isoflavones, indoles, isothiocyanates, phospholipids, saponins, anthraquinones and polyunsaturated fatty acids, and synthetic agents, including thiols, nuclear receptor agonists, histone deacetylase inhibitors, antiinflammatory drugs, and selective estrogen receptor modulators. As many as 145 miRNAs, involved in the control of a variety of carcinogenesis mechanisms, were modulated by these agents, either individually or in combination. Most studies used cancer cells in vitro with the goal of modifying their phenotype by changing miRNA expression profiles. In vivo studies evaluated regulation of miRNAs by chemopreventive agents in organs of mice and rats, either untreated or exposed to carcinogens, with the objective of evaluating their safety and efficacy. The tissue specificity of miRNAs could be exploited for the chemoprevention of site-specific cancers, and the study of polymorphic miRNAs is expected to predict the individual response to chemopreventive agents as a tool for developing new prevention strategies.

    0 0

    PMID:  Pharm Biol. 2015 Jun ;53(6):935-8. Epub 2014 Dec 4. PMID: 25473940 Abstract Title:  Antimutagenic and antioxidant activity of a protein fraction from aerial parts of Urtica dioica. Abstract:  CONTEXT: Urtica dioica L. (Urticaceae), stinging nettle, has been employed as a folklore remedy for a wide spectrum of ailments, including urinary disorders, prostatic hyperplasia, and liver diseases. It has been also used traditionally for cancer treatment.OBJECT: To evaluate the potential chemopreventive properties of a protein fraction from the aerial part of Urtica dioica (namely UDHL30).MATERIALS AND METHODS: UDHL30 has been tested for the antimutagenic activity in bacteria (50-800μg/plate; Ames test by the preincubation method) and for the cytotoxicity on human hepatoma HepG2 cells (0.06-2 mg/mL; 24 and 48 h incubation). Moreover, the antioxidant activity of UDHL30 (0.1-1200 μg/mL; ABTS and superoxide-radical scavenger assays) was evaluated as potential protective mechanisms.RESULTS: UDHL30 was not cytotoxic on HepG2 cells up to 2 mg/mL; conversely, it exhibited a strong antimutagenic activity against the mutagen 2-aminoanthracene (2AA) in all strains tested (maximum inhibition of 56, 78, and 61% in TA98, TA100, and WP2uvrA strains, respectively, at 800μg/plate). In addition, a remarkable scavenging activity against ABTS radical and superoxide anion (IC50 values of 19.9 ± 1.0 μg/mL and 75.3 ± 0.9 μg/mL, respectively) was produced.DISCUSSION AND CONCLUSIONS: UDHL30 possesses antimutagenic and radical scavenging properties. Being 2AA a pro-carcinogenic agent, we hypothesize that the antimutagenicity of UDHL30 can be due to the inhibition of CYP450-isoenzymes, involved in the mutagen bioactivation. The radical scavenger ability could contribute to 2AA-antimutagenicity. These data encourage further studies in order to better define the potential usefulness of UDHL30 in chemoprevention.

    0 0

    PMID:  J Nat Med. 2015 Feb 10. Epub 2015 Feb 10. PMID: 25666712 Abstract Title:  In vitro and in vivo antimutagenic effects of DIG, a herbal preparation of Berberis vulgaris, Taraxacum officinale and Arctium lappa, against mitomycin C. Abstract:  DIG, a liquid herbal preparation made from a mixture of diluted mother tinctures of Berberis vulgaris, Taraxacum officinale and Arctium lappa, was assessed for its antimutagenic properties against mitomycin C. The micronucleus assay on Chinese hamster ovary (CHO)-K1 cells was used to evaluate the in vitro anticlastogenic activity of DIG compared to those of separately diluted mother tinctures. The micronucleus assay was performed on mouse erythrocytes and the comet assay was performed on mouse liver, kidney, lung, brain and testicles to assess the protective effects of DIG (0.2 and 2 % at libitum) against an intraperitoneal injection of mitomycin C (1 mg Kg(-1)) in mice. DIG exerted a powerful anticlastogenic activity, under both pretreatment and simultaneous treatment conditions as assessed by the micronucleus assay in CHO-K1 cells. Its protective activity was greater thanthat observed for each mother tincture. DIG reduced micronuclei levels in mouse erythrocytes and suppressed>80 % of DNA strand breaks in the liver, kidney, lung, brain and testicles of mice exposed to mitomycin C.

    0 0

    n/a PMID:  Int J Mol Sci. 2017 Nov 4 ;18(11). Epub 2017 Nov 4. PMID: 29113066 Abstract Title:  Polyphenol-Rich Dry Common Beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) and Their Health Benefits. Abstract:  Polyphenols are plant metabolites with potent anti-oxidant properties, which help to reduce the effects of oxidative stress-induced dreaded diseases. The evidence demonstrated that dietary polyphenols are of emerging increasing scientific interest due to their role in the prevention of degenerative diseases in humans. Possible health beneficial effects of polyphenols are based on the human consumption and their bioavailability. Common beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) are a greater source of polyphenolic compounds with numerous health promoting properties. Polyphenol-rich dry common beans have potential effects on human health, and possess anti-oxidant, anti-diabetic, anti-obesity, anti-inflammatory and anti-mutagenic and anti-carcinogenic properties. Based on the studies, the current comprehensive review aims to provide up-to-date information on the nutritional compositions and health-promoting effect of polyphenol-rich common beans, which help to explore their therapeutic values for future clinical studies. Investigation of common beans and their impacts on human health were obtained from various library databases and electronic searches (Science Direct PubMed, and Google Scholar).

    0 0

    PMID:  Food Chem. 2018 Oct 1 ;262:56-66. Epub 2018 Apr 22. PMID: 29751921 Abstract Title:  Nutraceutical potential of hemp (Cannabis sativa L.) seeds and sprouts. Abstract:  In this study the antioxidant effect of Cannabis sativa L. seeds and sprouts (3 and 5 days of germination) was evaluated. Total polyphenols, flavonoids and flavonols content, when expressed on dry weight basis, were highest in sprouts; ORAC and DPPH (in vitro assays), CAA-RBC (cellular antioxidant activity in red blood cells) and hemolysis test (ex vivo assays) evidenced a good antioxidant activity higher in sprouts than in seeds. Untargeted analysis by high resolution mass spectrometry in negative ion mode allowed the identification of main polyphenols (caffeoyltyramine, cannabisin A, B, C) in seeds and of ω-6 (linoleic acid) in sprouts. Antimutagenic effect of seeds and sprouts extracts evidenced a significant decrease of mutagenesis induced by hydrogen peroxide in Saccharomyces cerevisiae D7 strain. In conclusion our results show that C. sativa seeds and sprouts exert beneficial effects on yeast and human cells and should be further investigated as a potential functional food.

    read more


    0 0

    n/a PMID:  J Agric Food Chem. 2011 Jun 22 ;59(12):6444-52. Epub 2011 May 17. PMID: 21561091 Abstract Title:  Antimutagenic constituents of adlay (Coix lachryma-jobi L. var. ma-yuen Stapf) with potential cancer chemopreventive activity. Abstract:  Adlay has long been used in traditional Chinese medicine and as a nourishing food. The acetone extract of adlay hull had previously been demonstrated to possess potent antimutagenic activity. The aims of this study were to identify the antimutagenic constituents from adlay hull by using Ames antimutagenic activity-guide isolation procedures and to investigate their chemopreventive efficacies in cultured cells. The results demonstrated that six compounds showing great antimutagenic activity were identified by spectroscopic methods and by comparison with authentic samples to be p-hydroxybenzaldehyde, vanillin, syringaldehyde, trans-coniferylaldehyde, sinapaldehyde, and coixol. Two of them, trans-coniferylaldehyde and sinapaldehyde, exhibit relatively potent scavenging of DPPH radicals, inhibit TPA stimulated superoxide anion generation in neutrophil-like leukocytes, and induce Nrf2/ARE-driven luciferase activity in HSC-3 cells. Moreover, trans-coniferylaldehyde possesses cytoprotective efficacy against tert-butyl hydroperoxide-induced DNA double-strand breaks in cultured cells, and the chemopreventive potency induced by trans-coniferylaldehyde may be through the activation of kinase signals, including p38, ERK1/2, JNK, MEK1/2, and MSK1/2. In summary, we first identified six antimutagenic constituents from adlay hull. Among them, trans-coniferylaldehyde would be a highly promising agent for cancer chemoprevention and merits further investigation.